Review Update

Okay, change of plans. Every two weeks, I will post multiple reviews on the records being released in that time period.. I realize I’m doing this blogging thing wrong, and consistency is the most important aspect of these things. Thank you all who have put up with me and listened to the things I have to say about music, I really appreciate it. But enough of the sob story, here’s the reviews this week!

Wolf

Whatever your opinion of Tyler may be, you have to admit he likes what he does. Tyler and his crew Odd Future rose to prominence after the single from his last record Yonkers rose to the top of the charts, and from that spotlight other members of his OF gained more solid fan-bases. The most interesting thing about Tyler is his unique production style; after a few seconds listening to a beat, I can tell if he made it. He explores lots of almost corny midi-horn tones and dissonant piano riffs, which somehow work wonderfully with overstated 808 drums and simple grooves. Like many late records, however, Wolf shows that even some of the more interesting elements of an artist cannot be exploited for too long before they become dry. Tyler and Odd Future in general are known for using dark, violent, and disturbing lyrics on their records, and Wolf is no exception. ‘Colossus is about Tyler’s struggle with fame and his problem with some of the more obsessed members of his fanbase, and ‘IFHY is a dark exploration of emotionally abusive relationships. The songs hold my interest, but only just barely, and there are definitely duds on the album that drag on for me. However, tracks like ’48’, ‘Slater (featuring the wonderful Frank Ocean), and ‘Rusty all show off Tyler’s production and lyrical strengths and remind you why he is where he is. I like Tyler, but this record really was underwhelming for me and defines why I tend to favor his fellow OF members Earl Sweatshirt and Frank Ocean over him. His explanation of emotions on this record is heartfelt, but if you’re familiar with his material, he’s done it all before. Overall, there’s a few good tracks on the record, but the OF train is starting slow down for me. Here’s my favorite track, ‘Rusty’.

Shaking The Habitual

The Knife are an interesting group. Made up of Swedish Siblings Karen Dreijer Andersson and Olaf Dreijer, the electronic duo have done a lot of exploring with their sound, and their most recent record delves deeply into experimental territory. Their last record Silent Shout won universal acclaim for its experimental tendencies and mesmerizing soundscapes, and the new record delves more into the former. Now, for those unfamiliar with the experimental genre (which is often used as a blanket turn for many types of music), this is not one or two interesting instruments being utilized within a tradition song-writing setting. This is a genre based upon creating the most original and eclectic sounds possible with the equipment available . This is not an easy listening genre, but for those willing to search for substance within it, it can be incredibly rewarding. While much of the record explores this type of sound, a few tracks do stand close to the the original dark electro sound that I fell in love with. Tracks like ‘Ready To Lose and ‘Wrap Your Arms Around Me still fit the context of the record, but are accessible enough to be enjoyed by those interested in the dark electronica the group excels in. To conclude, though I don’t have much experience with this type of experimental music, I did enjoy my listen through, and those tracks mentioned above were wonderfully crafted towards outside audiences. If you’re a fan of The Knife, give it a spin. Here’s my track pick, ‘Ready to Lose.

Overgrown

In early 2011, James Blake released his self titled record. It received rave reviews for his minimalistic approach and a warm, dark production style, and his lyrics were branded as heartbroken genius. I listened to the record, and honestly I wasn’t impressed. I felt that the record dragged, and I had heard several other artists  similar in style (see SBTRKT) that simply do it better. I heard about Overgrown being released, and I figured I would give James here a second chance.

The record definitely picks up where his self titled record left off. It still has a somewhat trodding sound on some of the tracks, but James’ voice has taken on a somewhat different persona. Instead of the mopey quality I heard on the first record, I now hear a very R&B influenced style that really comes through on tracks like ‘Retrograde. This quality definitely livens up the record, but it doesn’t save it from the qualities that turned me off from the original release. However, there are a few other tracks, namely ‘Digital Lion (produced with world renown sound wizard Brian Eno), that really breathe life into a record and make it a more enjoyable listen. Also, for some reason I really like the final track ‘Our Love Comes Back, though it doesn’t stray much at all from the sound that I’ve been berating for the last paragraph.

Overall, if you liked his debut, James Blake’s Overgrown will undoubtedly be an enjoyable listen. If you’re like me, you’ll find a few stand-out tracks, but nothing revolutionary. Here’s my favorite track, ‘Retrograde.

Indicud

Kid Cudi had a huge impact on my own musical taste in high school. He is one of several hip hop artists that actually brought me into the world of hip-hop, and his first record Man On The Moon still holds a special place in my heart. However, his sophomore effort left much to be desired, and only a few tracks really stuck for me. I was excited to see what would be done on this record, considering Cudi’s recent departure from Kanye’s label G.O.O.D Music and his decision to self produce. Unfortunately, the end result breaks my heart.

Each track drags, and the beats are not very well produced at all. Sometimes Cudi’s voice is so muddled with the instrumentals, I can’t even hear him. Occasionally, there’ll be a rap verse, immediately followed by a vocal silence with only the beat repeating. The songs are structured almost sporadically, and some tasty verses by guests A$AP Rocky, Kendrick Lamar, and Wu-Tang member RZA can’t save the record from what can only be described as sloppy production and songwriting.

There are one or two upsides; Cudi has improved as a singer, and this record gives him some experience in production that he had not had before. Hopefully his next release allows him to learn from his mistakes, and perhaps take some tips from his excellent old producers Plain Pat and Emile. Overall, unless you are a diehard Cudi fan, you can skip this one. Here’s his track with Kendrick, ‘Solo Dolo Pt. 2‘.

Bankrupt!

I first got into Phoenix about two summers ago when they released their hit record Wolfgang Amadaeus Phoenix. After that, I was hooked, and eagerly devoured their entire discography. Contrary to popular belief, the group is pretty prolific for an indie/pop band, releasing three albums before they made the charts. For their fifth release Bankrupt!, they keep doing what worked so well with Amadaeus; create catchy upbeat pop tunes with some heavy synth thrown in for good measure.

The first single, ‘Entertainment’, picks up right where Amadaeus left off: it provides bright, danceable beats and warm, electronic lows with rhythmic layered highs from guitar, synth, and Thomas Mars’ recognizable croon. However, the deeper I delved into the record, the more I realized how prevailant the synthy textures were compared to the last record. This electronic core differs considerably from the mostly guitar-driven tunes of Amadaeus, giving the album a slightly different feel. Different doesn’t mean bad; each track definitely feels like Phoenix and is just as infectious as their other material.

For whatever reason, however,  I was not as taken by the album as a whole in the same way I was with the previous outing. There isn’t too much variation in tempo or tone, which unfortunately makes every song very similar. I was struck by how similar the record is structured compared to its predecessor, in that they both have a longer song smack dab in the middle that separates two parts. The difference between these 6+ minute songs may be the defining factor in my experience;’Love Like A Sunset’ off of Amadaeus is just a better track than this record’s self titled track, which spans 7 minutes and is mostly just a yawn-worthy synthesized anecdote. It doesn’t contribute to the album much at all and  takes away from some of the better tracks on the record that follow. ‘Love Like A Sunset brought the previous record together perfectly, and the key component it held for the album experience is absent in Bankrupt!.

Overall, I do enjoy the record. I think I may be being unrealistic by expecting another record like the last one, but the shadow it casts is there whether I mention it or not. Though not as catchy or grabbing as Amadeus, Bankrupt! is still a solid entry in the Phoenix discography. Here’s my favorite track, ‘SOS in Bel Air’.

There you have it folks- the last couple weeks most prominent releases. I’ll be back next week for both Fitz and The Tantrums, Daughters and Vampire Weekend!

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DOUBLE REVIEW 2

Welcome to Round 2 of my Double Review extravaganza. This week, two albums were released: Stars’ “The North” and Animal Collective’s “Centipede Cz”. Both groups have made impressive releases in the past, so I went into these reviews with fairly high expectations. Let’s see how they fared.

Stars- The North

The first thing I thought when the first track began was “This is different”, which is not a bad thing in the slightest. Stars has an uncanny ability to encapsulate me with one song or section, only to put me to sleep the next. Stylistically, The North goes for  a more concise and traditional song form without sacrificing the effortless mix of strings, synth, guitar, and both live and electric drums. With this songwriting formula, as well as the excellent  male/female lyrical counterpoint I’ve come to expect from Stars, you would assume that this is their best album yet. It isn’t to my ears.

Though this record merits multiple enjoyable listens, with a growth factor measured in, it still does not live up to the best tracks of Heart or  records like In The Bedroom After the War or Set Yourself On Fire. There’s just a lack of energy and emotional sensitivity in The North that was displayed in spades in earlier endeavors. That element that kept bringing me back just isn’t there.

Now, this isn’t to say that the record is bad. The songwriting and structure are still superb, as is the production. I enjoyed listening to it. I just don’t feel that it has the longevity of previous works.

Best Tracks: Title Track, Theory of Relativity, A Song is A Weapon

Animal Collective- Centipede Cz

Deakin is back. After the critical acclaim of guitarless record Merriweather Post Pavilion, an excellent album in its own right, Deakin has returned from his hiatus to bring back some punch and texture, as well as his own peculiar style of songwriting. Those not familiar with AC’s earlier work may be a bit apprehensive to hear things get a little ‘weird’, but I personally love the input that the returning member had in Strawberry Jam and Feels.The real question remains; Did I enjoy his input on this record, and did I enjoy this record in general?

It’s a complicated answer to a simple question. It’s hard for me to listen to a musical group that has had such an impact on me previously, because I’ll have a heavy bias on those earlier works (some of you probably already know this from previous reviews). The simple answer is yes, I did enjoy it. However, I was not impressed with the songwriting and didn’t really notice any dramatic improvement in the bands’ execution. When I say improvement, I simply mean that nothing jumped out at me as original, and I didn’t notice any sections or stylistic touches unlike anything I’ve heard on their previous records. Call me crazy, but I feel like they were playing it safe.

Overall, a few songs popped for me, but not in the same memorable way that I’m used to when listening to these creative musical minds.

Best Tracks: Apple Sauce, Monkey Riches, Father Time

These reviews are obviously a week late, and they’ve been sitting on my desktop for the last 5 days. To make up for lost time, I’ll be reviewing The XX’s new release Coexist and the St.Vincent/David Byrne collaborative record Love This Giant tommorow. I’ll also be making a new page that includes my personal favorite albums of all time, just to give you a clue into my tastes and let you decide if you want to listen to me blab any longer. Ciao!

My Old Blog

My Old Blog

I used to use Tumblr for this sort of thing, but I’ve moved on to a more professional environment. Though some of the posts are outdated, those of you unfamiliar with my tastes or style can still get a feel for me, in a manner of speaking. I’ll still be posting there to cover all my bases, but it will probably be identical to what I post here.